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Messages - TinyCircuits

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76
TinyDuino / Re: BLE Board sample code
« on: September 23, 2013, 02:04:01 PM »
There are a few differences needed to get this to work, check out the section under Learn on our website for the BLE board, this includes some instructions and sample code on getting the BLE to work.

http://tiny-circuits.com/learn/using-the-bluetooth-low-energy-tinyshield/

Thanks,

Ken Burns
TinyCircuits


77
TinyDuino / Re: Problem with initial use of TinyDuino
« on: September 23, 2013, 02:02:17 PM »
Hi Mark,

Sorry for the late reply - it definitely sounds like their is an issue with either the USB or the Processor board.  I've emailed you privately and we'll get this replaced immediately.

Thanks,

KenBurns
TinyCircuits

78
TinyDuino / Re: TinyDuino Processor Board - temperature rating
« on: August 10, 2013, 07:03:39 PM »
Hi Tom,

We do plan on updating the website with more specs, most of the boards are designed for industrial temperature ranges (-40C to +85C), however the processor board itself has two components that fall outside of this range - the reset switch is rated from -25C to 70C and the green LED is rated from -30C to +85C.

Thanks,

Ken
TinyCircuits

79
TinyDuino / Re: Battery clip
« on: August 10, 2013, 06:59:53 PM »
Hi Chad,

I've updated the webstore, since we do have new TinyDuino's with the battery clip in stock.  For your reference, the clip is made by Keystone Electronics, part number 3013.  It's also available at Digi-Key as part number 3013K-ND.

Thanks,

Ken
TinyCircuits

80
TinyLily / Re: Can I make Tiny Lily even smaller?
« on: July 23, 2013, 11:55:06 AM »
Hi,

I'm not quite sure what you are asking - are you looking to cut away part of the PCB area on the TinyLily processor board?

Thanks,

Ken Burns
TinyCircuits

81
TinyDuino / Re: TinyShield Motor Driver
« on: July 23, 2013, 11:53:08 AM »
Nate -

The 5V from the USB is separate from the battery inputs on the main TinyDuino, and also separate from the VM from the motor board, so you won't see the 5V on those pins. 

Doh!  In looking at the sketch on the website I see one obvious problem, the sleep signal is not connected and this may be causing your problem by keeping the motors in sleep all of the time.  I'll fix this.

Here is a quick test that you can use, this should turn on the motor full blast in the forward direction.  Let me know if that works and sorry for the incorrect example.

Thanks,

Ken

Code: [Select]


int motorDirPin = 2;      // Motor direction connected to digital pin 2
int motorSpeedPin = 3;    // Motor speed connected to digital pin 3
int motorSleepPin = A3;      // Motor sleep to analog pin 3

void setup()
{
  pinMode(motorDirPin, OUTPUT);       // sets the pin as output
  pinMode(motorSpeedPin, OUTPUT);     // sets the pin as output
  pinMode(motorSleepPin , OUTPUT);     // sets the pin as output

  digitalWrite(motorDirPin, LOW);     // sets the default dir to be forward
  digitalWrite(motorSpeedPin, HIGH);   // sets the default speed to be full on
  digitalWrite(motorSleepPin , HIGH);   // sets the sleep mode to be off
}

void loop()
{
   // Don't do anything
}

82
TinyDuino / Re: TinyShield Motor Driver
« on: July 22, 2013, 02:56:39 PM »
Nate,

Sorry to hear you're having difficulty - on the motor shield itself, there are two pin holes at the top of the board - if you look on the underneath of the board close to where the TinyCircuits logo is, one pin says VM and the other says GND.  This is where the motor get's it power from - do you have both of these connected?

If so, can you supply the code that you are using to run these motors?

Thanks!

Ken Burns
TinyCircuits

83
General Discussion / Re: Is TinyDuino appropriate for beginners?
« on: July 04, 2013, 11:53:54 PM »
Hi Justin,

Thanks for your interest!  As a complete beginner, realistically an Arduino Uno or Due is probably a better bet, just because there easier to play around with things and get a feel for electronics and the Arduino platform.  That being said, it's not that hard to jump straight to a TinyDuino, but it is a slight bit more advanced than a standard Arduno.  Most people with a little Arduino experience can pick it up in no time, but for someone completely new to it, it may be easier to start with a standard Arduino then transition to a Tiny later.

Thanks!

Ken
TinyCircuits

84
General Discussion / Re: tiny screen/Display
« on: July 03, 2013, 07:51:19 PM »
It's actually quite tall though, which is a bit of a pain.  It also requires a high voltage for the LCD drive (think around 11 or 12V) - the orange wire on the side is running off to a bench supply, so it's not easy to interface too. 

Ken

85
General Discussion / Re: tiny screen/Display
« on: July 03, 2013, 04:58:40 PM »
Actually we did use one of those NKK OLEDs for an initial proof of concept and it's shown in the Kickstarter video.  Attached is a pict of this, it worked fairly well and is easy to program and the pictures are good, but it is very pricey.

Thanks,

Ken


86
TinyDuino / Re: Proto Board pins
« on: July 01, 2013, 06:39:01 PM »
The Arduino pins are abstracted from the "real" pins on the processor for a few reasons.  The biggest is that different versions of the processor boards (like Leonardo vs the Uno) have different processors, and the Arduino pins are not always connected to the same "real" pins on the chip.  Instead everything in the Arduino world is referenced to the "pin" as seen on the Arduino shield connectors, which stay constant, unlike the pins on the actual processor chip, which may change from revision to revision if the chip changes.

Thanks,

Ken




87
General Discussion / Re: USB & ICP board mosfet question
« on: June 30, 2013, 11:04:14 PM »
EKMallon,

All of the TinyShields are currently being designed to run from 3.0 - 5.0 Volts, and will have local power supplies and level translators.  There may come a time later on where there is some shield that would require more than 3V, but that's not the case yet with any of the boards we've designed (including all of the new boards - WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, etc).  One of our design goals with the TinyDuino system to eliminate the voltage different issues that tend to be a problem with a lot of existing Arduino shields.

For power, the other concern is the amount of current your power supply can source based on what boards you have in your stack.  Some of the RF boards and the microSD take more power than a coin cell can supply, so a larger power source is needed. 

With 3AA batteries you'll have no problem powering this as these have plenty of voltage and can easily supply the current needed for the microSD card accesses.

Thanks,

Ken

 


88
TinyDuino / Re: FTDI driver causing crash?
« on: June 29, 2013, 10:29:43 PM »
In looking at the Arduino forum, it seems to be somewhat common on a Mac when unplugging an Arduino.  I'd suspect an issue with the FTDI driver, although it doesn't look like the problem has been solved:

http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?PHPSESSID=6lee4vgaf30gid8lnf3r4aqmb1&topic=123901.0

If you have the serial monitor open, I'd definitely recommend closing that before unplugging.  Hope this gets fixed soon!

- Ken

89
TinyLily / Re: Pinout documentation
« on: June 29, 2013, 10:22:42 PM »
Sorry for taking so long to get better documentation up.  We're getting a number of new things up over the next week or two, one of the first ones is for the TinyLily Motor board documentation and some examples of how to use it.  Here's our first draft of this, we plan to update this with some photos and a video early next week. 

http://tiny-circuits.com/learn/tinylily-motor-board/

Thanks,

Ken

90
TinyDuino / Re: Proto Board pins
« on: June 29, 2013, 08:23:38 PM »
Donny,

The Arduino pin numbering can definitely be confusing, the most important thing to realize is that a 'pin' as defined by Arduino doesn't actually match up with the physical pin on the processor.  So the Arduino "pin 1" is not the same as the real pin 1 on the processor.

From the Arduino view point, all of the 'pins' are based on the shield connectors and shield signals.  So digital pins go from 0 - 13, and analog pins from A0 - A5.

On the TinyDuino it's the same as on the Arduino, although we show the IO as well, so "IO0 = Arduino pin 0", "IO1 = Arduino pin 1", etc.

So from the software side of things, if you want IO0 to be set to a logic-high (a '1'), you would write:

Code: [Select]
pinMode(0, OUTPUT);
digitalWrite(0, HIGH);

Again, the important thing is to ignore the actual pin numbers of the processor that you see on the schematic when you are writing your software.  Just focus on the numbers after the IO and you should be good.

Thanks,

Ken



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